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Per Olov Enquist

Blanche and Marie

Blanche Wittmann was admitted as a young patient to the psychiatric clinic at the Salpètriére Hospital in Paris. Her doctor was J M Charcot, renowned throughout the world as the first doctor to use hypnotism in the treatment of women who suffered what was then called hysteria. Among the visitors to his public seances were August Strindberg, Axel Munthe and the young Freud.

When Charcot died, Blanche got better and started working as an assistant to the Polish-French Nobel laureate Marie Curie. They became very close and Blanche knew of Marie’s misfortune when her love affair with a married colleague Paul Langevin caused a scandal at the same time as Marie received her second Nobel Prize for her discovery of radium. Blanche died in 1913, seriously injured by the radiation she had been subjected to.

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Enquist

Per Olov Enquist was born in 1934 in a small village in Norrland, the northern part of Sweden. After studies at the university of Uppsala he received his MA in 1960. Since the early sixties Enquist has worked as literary and theatre critic for several newspapers and magazines. He is one of Sweden’s leading contemporary…

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Sold to: Bosnia, Croatia: Fraktura, Czech Republic: Host, Denmark: Rosinante & Co, Finland: Gummerus, France: Actes Sud, Germany: Hanser, Greece: Papyros, Hungary: Europa, Italy: Iperborea, Korea: Woongjin, Latvia: Atena, Lithuania: Lithuanian Writers' Union, Macedonia: Antolog, The Netherlands: Ambo Anthos, Norway: Gyldendal, Poland: Santorski, Romania: Humanitas, Russia: Limbakh, Serbia: Evro Giunti, Slovakia: Milanium Press, Spain: Destino, UK: Harvill Secker, US: Overlook Press, Vietnam: The Literature Publishing House

Blanche Wittmann was admitted as a young patient to the psychiatric clinic at the Salpètriére Hospital in Paris. Her doctor was J M Charcot, renowned throughout the world as the first doctor to use hypnotism in the treatment of women who suffered what was then called hysteria. Among the visitors to his public seances were August Strindberg, Axel Munthe and the young Freud.

When Charcot died, Blanche got better and started working as an assistant to the Polish-French Nobel laureate Marie Curie. They became very close and Blanche knew of Marie’s misfortune when her love affair with a married colleague Paul Langevin caused a scandal at the same time as Marie received her second Nobel Prize for her discovery of radium. Blanche died in 1913, seriously injured by the radiation she had been subjected to.

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